Help Me See This Differently

"Prodigal Son" is a cliche we use to refer to a person who has left their family for a period of time and later returned. Many movies and novels use this storyline to convey themes of hope, unconditional love, and forgiveness. These stories tell of a son who is angry with his family and leaves, siblings who are left behind, parents sad and yet hopeful, then son returns, and parents welcome him back with open arms. Jesus uses this as a parable to teach of God's unending love for us.

We love happy endings of a family being re-united, but what about the feelings of the brother who was left behind, was loyal to his father, picked up the pieces, and had thoughts of: I’m doing the right thing, I’m sacrificing, I’m working my tail off, and no one notices, they just long for the other son to return. 

Have you ever felt like you weren't getting the attention you deserved for always doing the right thing? Does it seem like other people are off having fun while you are working? Do people make bad decisions without consequences while you do the right thing with no reward? 

As we all know, this kind of thinking leads us into a lonely way of living. Living behind walls of resentment, bitterness, comparison, jealousy, and a scarcity mentality.

Brick by brick, resentment brick by bitterness brick, we can build up walls of separation, telling ourselves there isn’t enough love, attention, or fortune to go around. 

Imagine if the older brother of the prodigal son prayed, “God help me see this differently.”

In those moments working in the hot field listening to his father reminisce about his brother, God help me see this differently.

In those moments imagining his brother living off the inheritance, partying all night, throwing around money, laughing with friends, Instagramming the happy moments, God help me see this differently. 

Standing outside the family party, too bitter to go in, too hardened to feel relief that his brother was alive, too hurt to allow his father’s unconditional love to sink into his own soul, God help me see this differently.

Opening ourselves to love is a continual practice. We choose our thinking in each moment…we can choose to feed ourselves with resentment and bitterness or we can open to the possibility that there is a better way. "Prodigal Son" is a cliche we use to refer to a person who has left their family for a period of time and later returned. Many movies and novels use this storyline to convey themes of hope, unconditional love, and forgiveness. These stories tell of a son who is angry with his family and leaves, siblings who are left behind, parents sad and yet hopeful, then son returns, and parents welcome him back with open arms. Jesus uses this as a parable to teach of God's unending love for us.

We love happy endings of a family being re-united, but what about the feelings of the brother who was left behind, was loyal to his father, picked up the pieces, and had thoughts of: I’m doing the right thing, I’m sacrificing, I’m working my tail off, and no one notices, they just long for the other son to return. 

Have you ever felt like you weren't getting the attention you deserved for always doing the right thing? Does it seem like other people are off having fun while you are working? Do people make bad decisions without consequences while you do the right thing with no reward? 

As we all know, this kind of thinking leads us into a lonely way of living. Living behind walls of resentment, bitterness, comparison, jealousy, and a scarcity mentality.

Brick by brick, resentment brick by bitterness brick, we can build up walls of separation, telling ourselves there isn’t enough love, attention, or fortune to go around. 

Imagine if the older brother of the prodigal son prayed, “God help me see this differently.”

In those moments working in the hot field listening to his father reminisce about his brother, God help me see this differently.

In those moments imagining his brother living off the inheritance, partying all night, throwing around money, laughing with friends, Instagramming the happy moments, God help me see this differently. 

Standing outside the family party, too bitter to go in, too hardened to feel relief that his brother was alive, too hurt to allow his father’s unconditional love to sink into his own soul, God help me see this differently.

Opening ourselves to love is a continual practice. We choose our thinking in each moment…we can choose to feed ourselves with resentment and bitterness or we can open to the possibility that there is a better way. 

Compassion for our LGBTQ Friends

Compassion for our LGBTQ Friends